Stalkture
  1. Homepage
  2. pathofthepanther

#pathofthepanther hashtag

Posts attached with hashtag: #pathofthepanther

Gerald Thompson (@geraldsavesflorida) Instagram Profile Photo
geraldsavesflorida

Gerald Thompson

Sarasota, Florida

Listen, I get it, wasps can be terrible. I don't like them, and if I'm being completely honest, I never will. Their stings suck, they pick out inconvenient spots to build nests so you'll run into them, and they're @emily_sisk_ 's only natural predator. Just in the past two days at work, I got stung twice; one stung me on my hip theough my shirt deeply enough to actually make me bleed (which has never happened to me before), and one stung my face in just the right spot to give me a black eye. But my philosophy on nature is that I don't want to hate animal just because it's inconvenient to people. So I looked up why they're important, what niches they fill. ..... The main wasp we see around us in Florida that build nests like this are called Paper Wasps. They get their name because their nests are actually made of paper, which they create by combining small pieces of wood pulp with their saliva and then molding into the honeycomb shape of the nest. In this picture, you can even see the eggs that they lay in each hole in the nest. They serve two main roles in the ecosystem, the first being a major insect predator, providing top-down control on their prey. The ones here primarily feed on caterpillars and beetle larvae, carrying it back to the nest to feed their own larvae. As much as we love caterpillars and butterflies, they could completely denude areas of vegetation and eat already endangered plants into extinction. The second purpose of wasps is as pollinators; while their non-furry bodies don't pollinate as efficiently as their bee cousins, they do visit and pollinate a very wide variety of plants, both to feed on other insects and to satisfy their own need to feed on sugar-rich nectar. ..... The vast majority of wasps do not form colonies and pose 0 threat to humans. I'm not saying any of us need to go out and give a wasp a hug. But recognize that as much as we might sometimes wish for a world without them, the ecosystem is healthier with them. Take steps to help conserve them, like planting native plants and limiting any pesticide use.

Luis Serrano Muñoz (@luisserrano) Instagram Profile Photo
luisserrano

Luis Serrano Muñoz

Cafe paris

from @natgeo Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward.| This series is from a new story about the future of the Florida panther. Visit the link in my bio or nationalgeographic.com/animals to learn how new toll roads could block the panther’s path to recovery. I’ve been covering the story of the Florida panther for the past three years using custom-made camera traps through my Path of the Panther project with @insidenatgeo. The Florida panther is the last subpopulation of pumas surviving in the eastern United States. It has persevered because of its ability to live in the hurricane-battered swamps of the southern Everglades, where as few as 20 panthers survived the hunting and persecution that eliminated pumas everywhere east of the Mississippi River. It’s from these Everglades swamps that the panther has staged its recovery, and is beginning to reclaim its historic territory in the northern Everglades and beyond. Panthers need expansive territory. One panther's home range is up to 200 square miles—ten times the size of Manhattan. That makes the Florida panther an umbrella species, which means protecting habitat for one panther helps protect habitat for hundreds of other species. As shown in these photos, a Florida black bear, white egret, American alligator (with a giant salamander in its mouth), and coyote all share the same trails with the panther. To learn more about the different species, how these photos were made, and what happened when Hurricane Irma hit my camera traps a few days after this panther photo was captured, please visit @carltonward. We are following the story of the endangered Florida panther to inspire protection of the Florida Wildlife Corridor (@fl_wildcorridor). @ilcp_photographers @pathofthepanther #pathofthepanther.

National Geographic (@nateonalgeographic) Instagram Profile Photo
nateonalgeographic

National Geographic

Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | Vehicle strikes are the leading cause of death for Florida panthers—nearly 30 panthers are killed on roads each year. Lara Cusack, panther veterinarian with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, examines a young male panther killed on Collier Boulevard in Naples, where development continues to sprawl east, cutting further into primary panther habitat. Please see the new National Geographic article by Douglas Main about how new toll roads threaten to block the recovery of the Florida panther. Learn how landscape-scale conservation planning, including wildlife habitat corridors and wildlife crossings at roads, can help reduce habitat fragmentation and road kills. In the second photo, a male Florida panther crosses safely beneath Interstate 75 from Picayune Strand State Forest to Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. This section of I-75 between Naples and Miami cuts through millions of acres of public land and primary panther habitat, including Big Cypress National Preserve. Thanks to cross fencing and more than 30 wildlife underpasses, there are rarely panthers or other large wildlife killed on the highway. The lesson is that wildlife crossings work very well, and all new roads through the wildlife corridors should have them. But even more important: we must conserve millions of acres of missing links in the Florida Wildlife Corridor for a connected habitat network to support wildlife crossing. This camera trap photo is the most technically complicated I’ve attempted. There are 14 camera flashes, 300 yards of cabling, three radio channels, and a laser trigger with a solar panel. Please visit @carltonward to learn more about the photography and @pathofthepanther project with @insidenatgeo and @fl_wildcorridor. #pathofthepanther

National Geographic (@nateonalgeographic) Instagram Profile Photo
nateonalgeographic

National Geographic

Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward.| This series is from a new story about the future of the Florida panther. Visit the link in my bio or nationalgeographic.com/animals to learn how new toll roads could block the panther’s path to recovery. I’ve been covering the story of the Florida panther for the past three years using custom-made camera traps through my Path of the Panther project with @insidenatgeo. The Florida panther is the last subpopulation of pumas surviving in the eastern United States. It has persevered because of its ability to live in the hurricane-battered swamps of the southern Everglades, where as few as 20 panthers survived the hunting and persecution that eliminated pumas everywhere east of the Mississippi River. It’s from these Everglades swamps that the panther has staged its recovery, and is beginning to reclaim its historic territory in the northern Everglades and beyond. Panthers need expansive territory. One panther's home range is up to 200 square miles—ten times the size of Manhattan. That makes the Florida panther an umbrella species, which means protecting habitat for one panther helps protect habitat for hundreds of other species. As shown in these photos, a Florida black bear, white egret, American alligator (with a giant salamander in its mouth), and coyote all share the same trails with the panther. To learn more about the different species, how these photos were made, and what happened when Hurricane Irma hit my camera traps a few days after this panther photo was captured, please visit @carltonward. We are following the story of the endangered Florida panther to inspire protection of the Florida Wildlife Corridor (@fl_wildcorridor). @ilcp_photographers @pathofthepanther #pathofthepanther.

Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward | Vehicle strikes are the leading cause of death for Florida panthers—nearly 30 panthers are killed on roads each year. Lara Cusack, panther veterinarian with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, examines a young male panther killed on Collier Boulevard in Naples, where development continues to sprawl east, cutting further into primary panther habitat. Please see the new National Geographic article by Douglas Main about how new toll roads threaten to block the recovery of the Florida panther. Learn how landscape-scale conservation planning, including wildlife habitat corridors and wildlife crossings at roads, can help reduce habitat fragmentation and road kills. In the second photo, a male Florida panther crosses safely beneath Interstate 75 from Picayune Strand State Forest to Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. This section of I-75 between Naples and Miami cuts through millions of acres of public land and primary panther habitat, including Big Cypress National Preserve. Thanks to cross fencing and more than 30 wildlife underpasses, there are rarely panthers or other large wildlife killed on the highway. The lesson is that wildlife crossings work very well, and all new roads through the wildlife corridors should have them. But even more important: we must conserve millions of acres of missing links in the Florida Wildlife Corridor for a connected habitat network to support wildlife crossing. This camera trap photo is the most technically complicated I’ve attempted. There are 14 camera flashes, 300 yards of cabling, three radio channels, and a laser trigger with a solar panel. Please visit @carltonward to learn more about the photography and @pathofthepanther project with @insidenatgeo and @fl_wildcorridor. #pathofthepanther

Gerald Thompson (@geraldsavesflorida) Instagram Profile Photo
geraldsavesflorida

Gerald Thompson

John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park

Throwback to this summer, swimming one of my favorite marine animals to share the water with: the Spotted Eagle Ray! My first two years in the Key, I was like Eagle Ray repellant. I only saw one, but it was pretty cool because it was a tiny pup that couldn't have been more than a week old that swam right past my feet in knee-deep water. But this Summer, I was blessed to see several, including this giant one in Key Largo. It's hard to tell from this picture, but from wing tip to wing tip, this one was almost as long as I was, close to 6 feet long. It looked massive gliding through the water, and it was definitely the biggest one I've ever seen, but they can grow to be almost double this size. ..... As these animals swim past you, you fall in a type of trance with the rhythmic beating of their majestic wings, propelling them forward with all the grace of a butterfly but slowly enough for you see every detail of their movements. Their extraordinarily long tail flows behind like a string following a kite, and each individual polka-dot, unique to that animal and that animal only, seems to dance on their skin. If you're lucky enough to be face-to-face with them, you'll be able to palpably feel their intelligence and curiosity, as their beady cat-like eyes scan you over and decide of they'll flee or reward you with another swim-by. This whole experience is special every time it happens, to the point where you almost don't believe it's real, the animal looking seeming like a cross between angelic beings and Dr. Seuss characters. #pathofthepanther

National Geographic (@natgeo) Instagram Profile Photo
natgeo

National Geographic

Photos by Carlton Ward Jr. @carltonward.| This series is from a new story about the future of the Florida panther. Visit the link in my bio or nationalgeographic.com/animals to learn how new toll roads could block the panther’s path to recovery. I’ve been covering the story of the Florida panther for the past three years using custom-made camera traps through my Path of the Panther project with @insidenatgeo. The Florida panther is the last subpopulation of pumas surviving in the eastern United States. It has persevered because of its ability to live in the hurricane-battered swamps of the southern Everglades, where as few as 20 panthers survived the hunting and persecution that eliminated pumas everywhere east of the Mississippi River. It’s from these Everglades swamps that the panther has staged its recovery, and is beginning to reclaim its historic territory in the northern Everglades and beyond. Panthers need expansive territory. One panther's home range is up to 200 square miles—ten times the size of Manhattan. That makes the Florida panther an umbrella species, which means protecting habitat for one panther helps protect habitat for hundreds of other species. As shown in these photos, a Florida black bear, white egret, American alligator (with a giant salamander in its mouth), and coyote all share the same trails with the panther. To learn more about the different species, how these photos were made, and what happened when Hurricane Irma hit my camera traps a few days after this panther photo was captured, please visit @carltonward. We are following the story of the endangered Florida panther to inspire protection of the Florida Wildlife Corridor (@fl_wildcorridor). @ilcp_photographers @pathofthepanther #pathofthepanther.

Gerald Thompson (@geraldsavesflorida) Instagram Profile Photo
geraldsavesflorida

Gerald Thompson

Bird Rookery Swamp

Had a fun day with the snakes at work today, so I figured I'd make a snake post . This is a juvenile Cottonmouth we found hanging out on the middle of the trail during a hike in Naples. All snakes, especially this species, get a really negative and inaccurate reputation. People will make outrageous claims about Cottonmouths, the most common being that they'll aggressively chase after you. This is complete fantasy. ..... First off, Cottonmouths are NOT aggressive. There's no such thing as an aggressive snake as far as humans are concerned, only defensive snakes. A lot of people will get absolutely convinced that they are being chased by Cottonmouths. Usually what happens is that a person gets between the snake their safe spot, whether it be the water, a hole they live in, etc., and the snake is willing to go past you to try and get to safety. I've also heard a lot of people claim they'll chase them and come into their boats. A boat provides structure in the water that they can rest on, and in the swampy habitat they live, most boats are fishing, giving the snakes chance for a potentially easy meal. ..... Additionally, no venomous snake wants to bite a human. Venom is very energetically expensive to produce for the snake, and it needs it to be able to kill it's prey. These snakes are quite smart and know that we are far too big to be potential prey.That's why Cottonmouths do their famous mouth gape, holding their white mouth open as a warning to stay away. They are extraordinarily difficult to provoke into biting too (I was only about a foot away from this one, and we came inches away from stepping on two other adults). When they do bite, over half of the strikes are "dry bites", a warning bite with no venom injected. Snakes can dangerous in certain situations, but these snakes kill less than 1 person a year on average. The large majority of snake bites come when people try to handle or kill the snake; snakes are incredible creatures vital to a balanced, diverse ecosystem, and they don't deserve to die just because they wind up in your yard. Chances are, the snake will keep moving if given the chance, but if not, call a wildlife professional to have it relocated.

English Turkish