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SOUND ON. Happy Anniversary, #ICESat2 !!!

Yuli Fernandez (@yulitafernandez) Instagram Profile Photo
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Yuli Fernandez

Bonita noche 🌕📡 #icesat2

American Geophysical Union (@americangeophysicalunion) Instagram Profile Photo
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American Geophysical Union

Linette Boisvert reporting: today NASA’s IceBridge flew parts of north Greenland’s glaciers. This one, Nordenskiold, terminates in Baffin Bay along an ICESat-2 ground track. We use our lasers ATM onboard to help validate the ICESat-2 satellite 🛰 #icesat2

ObserveMeritAppreciateKindness (@omak_label) Instagram Profile Photo
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ObserveMeritAppreciateKindness

Greenland is where it’s at. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ And by “it,” we mean three of our different ice measuring missions — Operation , Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) and the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ IceBridge is in Greenland beginning a series of flights to measure sea ice and land ice during the summer melt season. OMG is studying the ocean’s effect on the island’s melt and AVIRIS is verifying how the satellite Sat2’s lasers are working to see melty ice. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ In the last image, you can see all three planes meeting on the runway. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Image 1 & 2: Linette Boisvert/NASA⁣⁣ Image 3 & 4: John Sonntag/NASA⁣⁣ Image 5: Eugenia de Marco/NASA⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ " via @preview.app Carousel by @nasa

Greenland is where it’s at. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ And by “it,” we mean three of our different ice measuring missions — Operation , Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) and the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ IceBridge is in Greenland beginning a series of flights to measure sea ice and land ice during the summer melt season. OMG is studying the ocean’s effect on the island’s melt and AVIRIS is verifying how the satellite Sat2’s lasers are working to see melty ice. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ In the last image, you can see all three planes meeting on the runway. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Image 1 & 2: Linette Boisvert/NASA⁣⁣ Image 3 & 4: John Sonntag/NASA⁣⁣ Image 5: Eugenia de Marco/NASA⁣⁣ ⁣⁣

Kerstin Jacobs (@kerstin_kj) Instagram Profile Photo
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Kerstin Jacobs

#ICESat2 - Art of science - planet painting by - Kerstin Jacobs http://little-starlight-galaxy.eu

NPIglaciology (@npiglaciology) Instagram Profile Photo
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NPIglaciology

Last week, we discussed the two heatwaves that hit Europe this summer, and how they might impact the glaciers in the Alps. The impact will be strong, especially if these phenomena keep being repeated. This summer’s heatwave also impacted the Greenland Ice Sheet, causing extensive surface melt and creating what we call melt ponds on the surface. We can define melt ponds as pools of water on the surface resulting from nearby snow and ice melt. These melt ponds are common during the summer in Greenland, but the area they cover is increasing with time, especially with the recurrent heatwaves hitting the ice sheet. The National Snow and Ice Data Centre found that approximately 90% of the surface area of the Ice Sheet experienced surface melt between 30th July and 3rd August 2019. This melt event resulted in the loss of 55 billion tons of water, equivalent to 18,000,000 Olympic swimming pools. The MAR model (a regional climate model) simulated the same amount of melt, giving us good confidence in these observations. As you can see in the images from NASA ice on twitter, melt ponds are darker than the ice/snow surrounding them. These pools have a lower albedo than the surface of the ice sheet and therefore absorb more energy, which will accelerate the melt at the surface (this is what we call a positive feedback). Some of the melt ponds can reach up to 10 m depth below the surface, as seen by Sat2. Images: @nasa_ice (Twitter), Landsat, ICESat-2

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