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Posts attached with hashtag: #everestmystery

Mundo Geográfico (@mundgeo) Instagram Profile Photo
mundgeo

Mundo Geográfico

natgeo Foto de Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Kagi Sherpa depredan para comida, combustible, y restos de nieve para fundir para el agua a unos 28,000 pies (8,300 metros) en el Everest esta temporada pasada. Para mí fue un fuerte momento espiritual-para experimentar la majestuosidad de la montaña, pero también ver evidencia del cambio climático y los horrores de la humanidad. Sigue a @renan_ozturk para más imágenes de esta asignación de #EverestMystery.

Tahran

Photo by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | A hallowed gaze after one of the most impressive feats I've ever seen. I didn’t realize the load carried by many climbing Sherpa (some of these high-altitude workers are also Gurung, Tamang, and other Nepali ethnicities) each year on Everest. Starting at 20,000 feet (6,000m) from Advanced Basecamp with a load of oxygen bottles up to 100 lbs, they carry gear all the way to high camp, near 28,000 feet (8,300m), and back in a single push through the night, only stopping to hydrate and eat at the North Col. In my opinion, this is a more impressive display of raw willpower and physical prowess than actually going to the summit. Follow @best.image.national for more form this #EverestMystery assignment. . . .

Photo by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Stumbling down from the summit of Everest with Prakash Kemchay—the final humans on the mountain. Although Prakash works as a climbing sherpa, ethnically he is a Gurung, a culture equally as resilient and storied as the Sherpa. I learned a lot of cultural lessons this year, but if you take one thing away from this post let it be the difference between a "climbing sherpa," as it’s come to be known as a job title for a high-altitude guide and porter, and the Sherpa, Gurung, Tamang, or Rai people (and many more) who all work as climbing sherpas on Everest. Follow @renan_ozturk for more insight into the Everest season and the #everestmystery assignment this past year.

SpotitIndia 🇮🇳 (@spotitindia) Instagram Profile Photo
spotitindia

SpotitIndia 🇮🇳

@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ Photo by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Kagi Sherpa forages for food, fuel, and scraps of snow to melt for water at about 28,000 feet (8,300 meters) on Everest this past season. For me it was strong spiritual moment—to experience the majesty of the mountain but also see evidence of climate change and the horrors of humanity. Follow @renan_ozturk for more images from this #EverestMystery assignment.

National Geographic (@natgeo) Instagram Profile Photo
natgeo

National Geographic

Photo by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Stumbling down from the summit of Everest with Prakash Kemchay—the final humans on the mountain. Although Prakash works as a climbing sherpa, ethnically he is a Gurung, a culture equally as resilient and storied as the Sherpa. I learned a lot of cultural lessons this year, but if you take one thing away from this post let it be the difference between a "climbing sherpa," as it’s come to be known as a job title for a high-altitude guide and porter, and the Sherpa, Gurung, Tamang, or Rai people (and many more) who all work as climbing sherpas on Everest. Follow @renan_ozturk for more insight into the Everest season and the #everestmystery assignment this past year.

Gorgeous photo! I still maintain that the stalls around the Jokhang monastery and the back street turquoise market in Tibet is where our company was born!⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ @natgeo⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ .⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Photo by Renan Ozturk Renan_Ozturk | Yak driver this season. As soon as you show up at Base Camp at around 17,000 feet, the clock is ticking and your body begins to deteriorate in the thin air. As much there is a desire to shoot everything, especially with the pressure of a natgeo assignment, it can be your downfall: pushing too hard, getting sick, and ruining chances for surviving long enough for the ultimate goal to get high on the mountain. Such was the balancing act over the last two months, every shutter click and shot "expensive" in terms of overall life force of the expedition, every portrait precious. Mystery

BestätigtPhoto by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Kagi Sherpa forages for food, fuel, and scraps of snow to melt for water at about 28,000 feet (8,300 meters) on Everest this past season. For me it was strong spiritual moment—to experience the majesty of the mountain but also see evidence of climate change and the horrors of humanity. Follow @renan_ozturk for more images from this #EverestMystery assignment.

Climate Strike Scranton (@scrantonclimatestrike) Instagram Profile Photo
scrantonclimatestrike

Climate Strike Scranton

@natgeo with @make_repost ・・・ Photo by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Kagi Sherpa forages for food, fuel, and scraps of snow to melt for water at about 28,000 feet (8,300 meters) on Everest this past season. For me it was strong spiritual moment—to experience the majesty of the mountain but also see evidence of climate change and the horrors of humanity. Follow @renan_ozturk for more images from this #EverestMystery assignment.

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