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Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) Instagram Profile Photo

stevewinterphoto

Steve Winter

NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker. Now touring with @NatGeo Live! Watch Zoom India Highlight 4 info on my workshop in Nov.

https://zoomphototours.com/tigers-forever/

+1 2017234606

stevewinterphoto@mac.com

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Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto)

Hi all! Come join me on a photo tour to India—in two premiere tiger reserves, Bandhavgarh and Kaziranga—where we’ll also see elephants, rhinos and many other species! Dates - November 24 - December 4! And @zoomphototours is offering a discount for my Instagram followers! Use the code ”stevewinter2019” to get a $700 USD discount for a limited time. Go to https://zoomphototours.com/tigers-forever/ I had the luck to spend 36 hours with these 3 tigers resting at a waterhole!!

@stevewinterphoto Hi all! Come join me on a photo tour to India—in two premiere tiger reserves, Bandhavgarh and Kaziranga—where we’ll also see elephants, rhinos and many other species! Dates: November 24 - December 4! And @zoomphototours is offering a discount for my Instagram followers! Use the code ”stevewinter2019” to get a $700 USD discount for a limited time. Go to https://zoomphototours/tigers-forever/

@stevewinterphoto at @crocodilebay Humpback whale Tail out of the water in the Golfo Dulce at the southern tip of the Osa Penisula in Costa Rice. Thanks to @BryceJohnson520 and everyone at @crocodilebay - where @TimLaman and @stevewinterphoto spent five days photographing incredible diversity in the rainforest and on the water with whales and dolphins! In preparation for upcoming Wildlife Photo Master Classes - stay tuned! and thanks!

@stevewinterphoto at @crocodilebay Humpback whale Pectoral Fin out of the water in the Golfo Dulce at the southern tip of the Osa Penisula in Costa Rice. Thanks to @BryceJohnson520 and everyone at @crocodilebay - where @TimLaman and @stevewinterphoto spent five days photographing incredible diversity in the rainforest and on the water with whales and dolphins! In preparation for upcoming Wildlife Photo Master Classes - stay tuned! and thanks!

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Here is Scarface with another spectacular failure going after a caiman. Scarface spent 4 days swimming and walking the aisles of his supermarket - the Pantanal rivers! - looking for a caiman dinner! Nature does not let you pick things off the shelves - you need to work very hard for your food! Nature is perfection. It gives us the air we breathe and the water we all need for our life. Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for Asian Traditional Medicine and luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @natgeoimagecollection

@stevewinterphoto Happy Labor Day Weekend!! Time to wear your sweet corn hat at your County Fair!!! @natgeoimagecollection @natgeo Shot on my iPhone

@stevewinterphoto A flamboyance of flamingos in Rio Lagartos Yucatan Rio Lagartos was created to save such a charismatic, graceful and beautiful species - the flamingo. This wetland, mangrove and forest area is protected because of the flamingo - so everything above the water - like the jaguar and below the water - the mangroves, fish, rays dolphins, and nesting sea turtles are all protected because of this amazing bird. @natgeoimagecollection @natgeo

@stevewinterphoto Elephants coming together out in the bush of Zakouma National Park in Chad. @africanparksnetwork We as humans are apart of nature - the natural world keeps us alive - giving us the air we breathe, the water we drink - the land to grow the food we eat. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork @natgeo

@stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork Here children from a local nomadic village close to @Zakouma_national_park are finishing school for the day. The last thing they do for their lessons is to draw an animal that is found in the national Park. Today it is an elephant!!! The children participate in the wonder of their park and benefit from the schools, healthcare and jobs for their mothers, fathers and other family members - a true ecosystem that works for the good of all. It is so important to include the local communities in any conservation effort regarding protection of a National Park and the animals which live within. Finding sustainable solutions so people and wildlife can share the surrounding areas. And providing jobs from the park for the communities - training to be guards, tourism and providing education and health care to the communities that live close - so the park, management and communities are their own ecosystem - all working to protect the land and the animals within. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their way back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

@stevewinterphoto Join me on a Photo Safari in Kaziranga and Bandhavgarh National Park in India. I had the once in the lifetime opportunity to spend over five months in both Kaziranga and Bandhavgarh NP in India working for @natgeo on two story’s. Join myself and NG Writer, Explorer and Woodrow Wilson Global fellow Sharon Guynup (who also wrote our NG Books - “Tigers Forever”) this November 24th - December 4th for a trip to both Kaziranga and Bandhavgarh NP. Space is limited so please book now. Get a $700 discount when you make your reservation by using the code “stevewinter2019" at @zoomphototours This is also a once in a lifetime experience as I have not been back to Kazi or Bandhavgarh. So this trip will be very special for us all. thanks @stevewinterphoto

@stevewinterphoto Over the past three decades, the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic has declined by a stunning 95 percent, according to NOAA. The sea in the arctic has changed dramatically - which impacts polar bears, walrus and other arctic creatures. If ice continues to melt - the planet will warm further as the dark ocean water absorbs large amounts of solar heating that used to be deflected by the bright white ice. We followed this polar bear as it was walking somewhere in Svalbard aboard the Icebreaker M/V Kinfish. @stevewinterphoto @naturalworldsafaris @natgeoimagecollection @natgeo

@stevewinterphoto Over the past three decades, the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic has declined by a stunning 95 percent, according to NOAA. The sea in the arctic has changed dramatically - which impacts polar bears, walrus and other arctic creatures. If ice continues to melt - the planet will warm further as the dark ocean water absorbs large amounts of solar heating that used to be deflected by the bright white ice. We followed this polar bear as it was walking somewhere in Svalbard aboard the Icebreaker M/V Kinfish. @stevewinterphoto @naturalworldsafaris @natgeoimagecollection @natgeo

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