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sarahyltonphoto

Sara Hylton

Canadian visual artist | @natgeo contributor | @pulitzercenter + @theiwmf grantee | Represented by @reduxpictures | 📍New York

http://www.sarahylton.com/

+1 3479782830

saralhylton@gmail.com

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Sara Hylton (@sarahyltonphoto) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Sara Hylton (@sarahyltonphoto)

Mother Earth

I am posting this photograph of Santosh Bhavanth, an 11-year-old boy who picks Moringa from a tree on his family’s farm. Santosh lives in a small village in Telangana state, a region of India that is prone to extreme weather fluctuations and drought. Global temperature increases have intensified periods of drought, heatwaves, and unpredictable rainfall @janice.cantieri writes. It is people like Santosh whose childhood and innocence will be the first to experience the impacts of climate change. I made this photograph while on assignment for @natgeo looking at how small farmers are adapting to through greenhouse farms in April 2018. * Today is the climate strike, and I think of the future of our youth, and people like Santosh. Today young people across our earth leave their classrooms to unite for change. In them, I feel hope, but it is also not their job to right our wrongs. We all have to wake up and take action. As @gretathunberg so aptly stated: listen to the scientists. * Wherever you are, I encourage you to take action for the future of our youth.

Check it, very beautiful imagery from some of my favourite @natgeo photographers sharing their personal summer moments. Link in bio to a truly nice way to begin (or end) your Thursday! Thanks @maurafriedman! - Boats gather on the Meghna River, one of the three major tributaries of the Ganges Delta, during National Geographic’s all-female Sea to Source expedition. For photographer Sara Hylton, who spent early summers in the lobster fishing community of Canada’s east coast, “the boats [in Chandpur], the warm light embracing the laborers, and the pace of survival reminded me of my own childhood days learning about subsistence on the water.”

I am grateful to share a portfolio of images from Pakistan in the August “Borders” issue of @vicemagazine. These images thread together the intimate reality of a community of Afghan refugees living in a settlement on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan. — “Though peace talks are underway in Afghanistan, making it a perhaps more appealing place to live for refugees, the future appears tenuous for the children of I-12, who, at least in the immediate future, will continue to live out their childhood on the sidelines—neither from here, nor from there. Even if they do cross the porous border from Pakistan into Afghanistan, “home” remains a concept for the privileged, a luxury for now largely out of their grasp.” — Thank you @elizabethrenstrom for being such a supportive editor, to @pulitzercenter for supporting this work, and to @annie.hylton for sifting through my jumbled writing. Mostly I’m grateful to have met these beautiful souls.

I am grateful to share a portfolio of images from Pakistan in the August “Borders” issue of @vicemagazine. These images thread together the intimate reality of a community of Afghan refugee children living in a settlement on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan. — “Though peace talks are underway in Afghanistan, making it a perhaps more appealing place to live for refugees, the future appears tenuous for the children of I-12, who, at least in the immediate future, will continue to live out their childhood on the sidelines—neither from here, nor from there. Even if they do cross the porous border from Pakistan into Afghanistan, “home” remains a concept for the privileged, a luxury for now largely out of their grasp.” — Thank you @elizabethrenstrom for being such a supportive editor, to @pulitzercenter for supporting this work, and to @annie.hylton for sifting through my jumbled writing. Mostly I’m grateful to have met these beautiful souls.

Kenny Still Smoking, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana. Searching for and manifesting the quieter, more poetic moments in my practice these days. The moments that reveal a detail about a person. Their history. Thank you to everyone who hears me and listens to me as I grow and expand, thank you @jasoncandrew for telling me to photograph how I feel whether I find myself in sunflower fields or abandoned man camps. Making photographs can be deeply transformative, spiritual. That’s what I’m after. More soon.

Sometimes the anxiety of passing your film through several xrays and 110 degree heat is worth it. There is one thing, and maybe only one thing, that is very clear to me. It’s about getting close. Intimate. I’ve always been a portrait maker. For me, the only reason worth making a photograph is to get a glimpse of soul. The soul of the person I am sharing space with. My own soul. In an instant. Dancing with emotion, color, and light, sometimes things work. Rarely. @insidenatgeo

I had the privilege of documenting a female-led team of scientists and engineers (supported by @insidenatgeo) that spent seven weeks researching plastic along the Ganges, from sea to source. — While the communities and cultures vary widely, from the Bay of Bengal in Bangladesh up to the Himalaya in India, one common thread was the value of communities dealing with waste. These communities are primarily marginalized and working informally, but their role is critical in keeping their cities and communities clean. Estimates suggest that the informal sector of waste pickers, or kabadiwallas, recycle somewhere between 70 to 80 percent of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles disposed of in India. This rate is far higher than some of the most developed countries, including the United States. Please find captions in the comments section.

I've been missing in action these past couple of months and not posting much on @instagram. But something very important has happened, and I am here for it. Canada’s three-year National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls released its findings in early June. The inquiry concludes that violence against women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA "amounts to a race-based genocide of Indigenous peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis” for which the country itself is to blame. -- In this image, Tracey George Heese, sits in a tepee on buffalo skin, a symbol that reminds her of her late mother, Winnifred George. Winnifred was murdered and discovered next to a park bench in Edmonton, Alberta, more than 20 years ago. Tracey still has no answers and is among countless others who await justice. To those in power and authority: “have you really heard any of us?” Tracey asks. -- While the inquiry is a step in the right direction, many Indigenous women and families seek justice and concrete action that tackles colonial structures. -- I'm grateful to expand this body of work in the United States this summer with support from @pulitzercenter. The work must go on.

Varanasi, India

There’s nothing like a good cup of tea at the end of the day. I walked by this kitschy shop in after a long day in the heat, reflecting on the rarity of such spaces. I slowly moved in, it did not escape me that I was in a room full of men. But no one seemed to mind, I was served a fresh cup of chai before I decided I wanted one, and my cash was refused. Sometimes, and when it is needed, I am struck by the way this place takes care of me.

Spending time with fishing communities on the lead-up to has taught me a lot about the sustenance that comes from river and water systems and the lives that depend on them. Approximately 400 million people live along the , making it the worlds most populated river basin. These communities are intimately connected to this body of water - living, breathing, praying, loving, surviving, and dying along its banks. The health of humans depends upon the health of our waters. Now more than ever we are being called as a species to look at our relationship to consumerism and waste and our future on this planet. We can all do better, for each other, for other species with which we share this small planet, and for future generations who need us to act now. Be the change. @insidenatgeo

I’ve been on a beautiful journey in Bangladesh with an international, all-female team of scientists who are working with National Geographic and partners to scientifically document plastic waste in the Ganges watershed from sea to source. The team is focused on working with local communities to develop holistic and inclusive solutions to plastic and its detrimental impact on our planet. This has been an incredible adventure - but the most meaningful part for me is connecting with communities who make me believe in humanity and hope for a better future. Here Sumaiaya and her sister Suborna participate in a youth community clean-up in Bhola district. I’m always grateful for the gift of this work. @insidenatgeo @natgeo

Here are a few images I made from a recent trip with one of my favorite collaborators @chandrahaschoudhury (who just happened to release his third book, yay). We traveled on India’s first express train from New Delhi to Varanasi over the span of 8 hours — it was a poetic journey of sorts, from the country’s modern hub to its traditional, sacred underbelly.

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