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Monterey Bay Aquarium

🌊 Dive into the wonders of the sea and our mission to conserve the ocean! 🐙 montereybayaquarium.org 🐟 @SeafoodWatch

https://mbayaq.co/2k31rBZ

+1 8316484800

equarist@mbayaq.org

886 Cannery Row Monterey, California

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Monterey Bay Aquarium (@montereybayaquarium) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Monterey Bay Aquarium (@montereybayaquarium)

Monterey Bay Aquarium

We don’t have much else to say except: Look at this inkredible Galiteuthis glass squid from our colleagues @mbari_news!! 😍🦑 OK, no wait, here’s some more to say: The cranchiid squid, a.k.a glass squid like this Galiteuthis sp., often have light-producing s called photophores around their eyes. Cephalopod photophores can be a simple group of light-producing (“photogenic”) cells, or they can be quite complex, with photogenic cells surrounded by reflectors, lenses, light guides, color filters and muscles. Complex photophores are often able to actively adjust the color, intensity and angular distribution of the light they produce. Scientists believe that these photophores around the eyes provide counter-illumination, where the produces light to cancel out the shadow cast by the squid’s eyeballs in the faint deep-sea light. In the vast midwater of the deep sea, where there’s nowhere to hide and your shadow is your enemy, glass squid photophores make light work out of camouflage.

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Live look at a mother skeleton shrimp prepping her ghostly brood for this post:

Monterey Bay Aquarium

SPOTTED: African penguins Monty and Poppy in their new tuxedos! 📷 ➡️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hatched at the Aquarium in January 2018, these two youngsters recently made the switch from their gray kid feathers to their new black-and-whites, each dappled with a spot-pattern that’s uniquely their own! Poppy now sports a stunning smudge of spots on her neck, while Monty kept his look sleek and sharp. They grow up so fast! 😭❤️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ !

Monterey, California

I spin on the circle of wave upon wave of the sea —Pablo Neruda

Monterey, California

Sealing in our weekend rest and relaxocean plans 😴 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Monterey, California

Major Mola Moment: First confirmed hoodwinker sunfish photographed in Monterey Bay!! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Known to science as Mola tecta, the hoodwinker sunfish was officially described in 2017 by Dr. Marianne Nyegaard at Australia’s Murdoch University and were thought to live mainly in the cold waters around Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Southern Chile—until a massive hoodwinker sunfish washed up in Santa Barbara earlier this year. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The common ocean sunfish, Mola mola, is no stranger to Monterey Bay—we see youngsters and heavyweights throughout the year, and we’ve frequently had them on display in the Open Sea. But this sighting of M. tecta was tantalizing for sunfish researchers: Are hoodwinkers new arrivals to the area, carried by Chile’s cool Humboldt current and somehow punching their way through the equator and into our temperate waters? Or have hoodwinkers been around these parts for some time, hiding in plain sight? Whatever the case, there are now at least two more M. tecta confirmed here in California, and the first-ever identified in Monterey Bay! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Things got exciting in August when we shared an image by photographer @hiimjoe88 under the guise of a “Mola mola Monday Motivoceanal Moment!” and someone on Tumblr commented that the fish looked more tecta than mola. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Intrigued, we forwarded more images from @hiimjoe88 and his dive buddy @hijrsosky to Senior Aquarist and resident mola expert Michael Howard who thought there was a chance that a hoodwinker had been found. He got us in touch with Marianne Nyegaard herself, and she confirmed that these were indeed the first images of Mola tecta in Monterey Bay! Then, just three weeks later, diver @weiweigao happened upon another one! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In email exchanges that used up our yearly supplies of exclamation points, Dr. Marianne remarked that these sightings show just how little we know about one of the ocean’s most iconic fishes. The word “tecta” is Latin for “hidden”—a perfect moniker for a hoodwinker. Consider this your o-fish-al welcome to Monterey Bay, Hoodwinker Sunfish! You certainly had us fooled 😅 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ !

Monterey Bay Aquarium

🚨ATTENTION CALIFORNIANS!🚨 There’s still time to urge your state officials to vote YES on the California Plastic Pollution Reduction Act. To share your voice—just follow the link in our profile, fill in the short form and you’re done! The California Plastic Pollution Reduction Act sets targets to reduce waste from single-use plastic, and helps make sure the waste we do generate is actually recycled—steps that will help our ocean. Please ask your state officials to vote YES on this bill. Together we can create the future we want to see for the ocean and for the people and animals that depend on it. 🙏 📷 Jim Capwell

Monterey, California

A humpback whale launches face-first into its daily seafood special at the Monterey Bay buffet, slurping up all it can eat before migrating south with this blubbery breach-bod to its tropical breeding grounds. 📷 @hijrsosky

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Goodbye, August—Hello, Sea-ptember! Soaking up the summer sun and celebrating all the hard workers out there making the world a brighter place 💪☀️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Monterey Bay Aquarium

The wait is over, chambered nautiluses are back on display in the Aquarium’s “Tentacles” special exhibition! Nautiluses are survivors of an ancient ocean that once teems with shelled cephalopods, before competition with fishes and catastrophic extinction events nearly wiped them all out. Chambered nautiluses have existed in some form for over 500 million years, living a scavenging life in the darkness of the deep sea. Having survived everything Nature has thrown at them so far, their biggest hurdle is surviving us and our love of their shells! Nautiluses live 20+ years, and grow and reproduce very slowly. The unsustainable harvest of nautiluses for their shells is putting pressure on populations worldwide. Our nautiluses are here has a part of scientific research efforts to better understand their life cycle. We’ve partnered with researchers in Fiji who are working to protect and manage these animals, and we hope to inspire people to conserve nautiluses in the wild. Help us spread the word to leave the shells to the nautiluses, and let’s all join together and show the world some appreciocean for these masterful mollusks!

Monterey, California

Rockpool blennies, like this character from a local crevice, are cirri-ously well-coiffed coastal Californian critters! 📷 @ocean_phil

Monterey Bay Aquarium

🎉 HAPPY 20TH BIRTHDAY, ROSA 🎉 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Rosa is an icon of our Aquarium family—we’ve known her since she was just a five-pound, four-week-old pup, stranded as an orphan in September 1999. Now our oldest sea otter, Rosa has seen and done a lot in her time with us! Instantly recognizable on our and on exhibit because of her bright, platinum-blonde fur, Rosa has delighted and inspired generations of Aquarium guests with her signature swimming moves and naps in her favorite spot next to the windows. Her patience and natural maternal instincts also made her one of our most successful surrogate moms—she raised 15 pups before retiring last year! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Rosa is beginning to slow down and show signs of her age, so our incredible otter staff works to keep her comfortable in her retirement. Just like humans, otter vision declines with old age, so our team uses audio and tactile cues in addition to Rosa’s usual visual cues to help her during her training, and she gets frequent physical check-ups to keep her healthy. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Thank you, Rosa, for all of your work as an ambassador for your species, and for being a truly otter-this-world part of our lives! ❤️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ !

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Shark science doesn’t always kid around—but when it does, it’s the heartwarming story we all needed. Once upon a time, a white shark, named “Chippy” by our scientists, swallowed one of our “Fitbits for Sharks” via a blubber burrito lure. Chippy, like other white sharks, eventually regurgitated the tag, just as he would skulls and bones from his seal meals. But in the belly of the beast, Chippy’s tag had been damaged. Lost at sea with a broken antenna, the tag travelled silently with wind and waves from California to a Hawaiian beach. There, eagle-eyed eight-year-old explorer Ka’eo Paradis discovered our data-in-a-bottle washed up on the rocks. After 15 months on its own, Chippy’s tag had finally been reunited with its data dad, our senior research scientist Dr. Sal Jorgensen. Chippy’s tag was full of data that are helping Sal and his team get a glimpse into the secret lives of white sharks. And in a wonderful turn of events, Ka’eo and his grandmother were able to follow the tag back across the Pacific to spend time with Sal and learn about white shark research. Ka’eo is planning on studying hammerhead sharks and becoming a biologist himself, much like Sal’s grandmother spurred his interest in ocean exploration back in the day. Here are the photos from Ka’eo’s trip to the Aquarium, and we’ve got the full story in our profile link. Thanks for finding our tag Ka’eo! We can’t wait to work for you someday!! #😭😭😭

Monterey Bay Aquarium

PHYSICS: so to spruce up your surfaces some light diffraction goes a long w-yes, question? KISSLIP CUTTLEFISH: yes hi Physie big fan of what you’re doing with iridescent light here PHYSICS: aw tsym KISSLIP: we should tentacollab!?? PHYSICS: YES let’s gooo!! KISSLIP: 💋💋💋 . Cuttlefish skin is equipped with a panoply of cells that help the animal camouflage and communicate. Chromatophores provides browns, yellows and reds, while leucophores act like a brilliant white mirror to incoming light. Iridophores breakup incoming light as it dances over the cuttle’s skin to reveal beautiful blues, greens and purples—which kisslip cuttlefish use in their gorgeous mating displays!

Monterey Bay Aquarium

🌟Welcome to the world, little floof!🌟 We’re proud to announce that a new common murre chick hatched behind the scenes at the Aquarium on August 11 as part of a species survival plan to help wild murres. Swipe through for murre cuteness! ➡️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Our curator of aviculture, Aimee Greenebaum, said the chick is doing well behind the scenes and is very vocal. During an exam on Wednesday, the little one weighed in at 165 grams—almost 100 grams more than its hatch weight of 67 grams just ten days earlier—a sign that it’s eating and growing like a champ! 💪🐣 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The chick, whose is still unknown, will spend about two months behind the scenes learning how to be a murre and growing into its feet before joining the rest of our colony on exhibit. Stay tuned for murre updates!! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #😭❤️

Monterey, California

We’re feeling a little sealy on this sunny summer Wednesday! 🤪 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Harbor seals call Monterey Bay home all year round, and are frequently spotted sunning themselves on sandy beaches and boulders near the coast. With their big, round eyes, and long whiskers built for detecting a delicious dinner, they dive into our chilly waters at night to hunt for unsuspecting fish and invertebrates, or take a dip during the day to cool off. If you’re ever on the coast, keep an eye on the water for a salty snout sticking out—a sure sign there’s a submerged seal shying away from the midday sun! ☀️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 📷: Thanks to local underwater photographer Joe Platko (@hiimjoe88), who recently had the good fortune of seaing this furry friend pop up to wave hello while he was freediving in the Monterey Bay! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Is there something cuttlefishy about a bigfin reef squid? Or are they just squidding around? With long fins that extend around their bodies, these sensational cephalopods sure seem more cuttlefish than squid—but it’s what’s on the inside that really matters! Both cuttlefish and squid have remnants of their ancient external molluscan shells, but whereas cuttlefish have broad, porous cuttlebones inside their mantles, squids like these have flexible, feather-shaped pens. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Looking for something stunning to start your week? We got you. 😍 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Friday mood ☝️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The last of the pigeon guillemots are still soaking up the summer sun (and feasting on the fish) in Monterey before heading out to sea! Soon they’ll fly north to chill near the coasts of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest, returning in the spring to their same nest sites along rocky shores and cliffs—or, in our case, underneath our back deck! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

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