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lynseyaddario

Lynsey Addario

Pulitzer prize-winning photojournalist and author of ‘It’s What I Do’. My new book ‘Of Love & War’ with @penguinpress is available on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Love-War-Lynsey-Addario/dp/0525560025

addariolynsey@gmail.com

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Lynsey Addario (@lynseyaddario) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Lynsey Addario (@lynseyaddario)

McAllen, Texas

What’s in my camera bag this morning: electrolytes, protein, charger, back medication, lip gloss, a cookie. ... on assignment for @nytimes in . Oh yeah- and my cameras!! @nikonusa

Donna, Texas

On assignment for the @nytimes in .

@findinghome.with @get_repost ・・・ Congratulations to @francescatrianni @arynebaker and all those at @time who helped with @findinghome. ... the World Premiere of PARADISE WITHOUT PEOPLE will be at the Woodstock Film Festival @woodstockfilmfest this October. Hope to see you there ✨ . 10/04, 12:30 PM, RHINEBECK Upstate Films Photo by @lynseyaddario

LAVO NYC

. If you’re here tomorrow, Please join me and the great @jbmoorephoto at @photoville NYC on Sunday, September 15 at 3PM – 4:30PM, St Ann’s Warehouse, 45 Water Street, which is next to the Photoville Site.

In May 2000, I made my first trip to Afghanistan when it was under Taliban rule because I was curious about the situation of women living under such extreme Sharia Law. I returned two additional times before the attacks of 9/11. When the planes hit the twin towers, I had just settled into a new home in Mexico City, and suddenly, I knew my life for the next decade (or two) would be back in South Asia, trying to understand the genesis of these attacks, and their aftermath. I got on the first plane I could out of Mexico City, stopped in New York to pick up my first digital camera, and flew to Pakistan. There, we waited for the war to begin. @penguinpress

Syria

For an upcoming @natgeo story, I worked in Baghouz, Syria, covering the last stronghold of ISIS, March 2019. Here I am captured by @eddyvanwessel running through a sniper alley with @afshinismaeli where ISIS positions were as little as 150 meters away. Really looking forward to talking at @photoville NYC with my friend and fellow photojournalist, @jbmoorephoto on Sunday, September 15 at 3PM – 4:30PM, St Ann’s Warehouse, 45 Water Street, which is next to the Photoville Site.

Perpignan, France

It’s great to be back at @visapourlimage exhibiting ten years of work on maternal mortality from around the world.

I photographed Rwandan peacekeeper Alice Uwingeneye, 27 years old, during morning foot patrol with police peacekeepers from the UNMISS BASE, Juba, South Sudan, June 2019. There are a total of 247 female police peacekeepers in the force. This is an outtake from a forthcoming story for @natgeo, to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. @nikonusa

YPJ women fighters check the wives and relatives of ISIS fighters as they surrender at a corridor near Baghouz, Northern Syria. March 9th, 2019. This is an outtake from an upcoming coming story for @natgeo to be published in November. I’ll be posting a series of outtakes in the coming months leading up to the story. @nikonusa

New York

Really looking forward to talking at @photoville NYC with my friend and fellow photojournalist, @jbmoorephoto on Sunday, September 15 at 3PM – 4:30PM, St Ann’s Warehouse, 45 Water Street, which is next to the Photoville Site. Pictured above, Members of the Mahdi army patrol the streets in Sadr City, Iraq, July 2004. In the second image as US Marines, Tikrit residents line up on the bridge to exit Tikrit for the first time since fleeing because of the war, days after the regime of Saddam Hussein fell from power, Iraq, April 2003.

Pictured above for @nytimes, Ismael, an immigrant from Sudan, being pulled from underneath a truck by Greek border security in Patras, August 2014. Greece, through its border with Turkey, was easier for unauthorized immigrants to reach than most of the rest of Western Europe, and so it became a common transit point. Migrants have been found near death after some of their riskier escape attempts to try to make it to Europe. They often survived bleak conditions and treacherous journeys. When I asked Ismael where he was from, he told me Darfur. I explained I had spent six years covering the war there between 2004-2009. I asked where his family was, and he paused, sat down, lowered his head, and wept. His tears dropped onto his handcuffed wrists. We don't often hear the tragic individual stories of the migrants and refugees often reduced to numbers and statistics. From the @nytimes piece by Suzanne Daly: “But after a long and often dangerous trip, they found themselves not in the land of opportunity they had envisioned, but in a country struggling to take care of its own people and increasingly hostile toward the waves of immigrants arriving from Afghanistan, Iran, Sudan and other ravaged or repressed places.” @nikonusa

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